Skip to main content
Funded Studies

Anne Messer, PhD

Principal Investigator at Neural Stem Cell Institute, Regenerative Research Foundation

Professor at Department of Biomedical Sciences, University at Albany

Location: Rensselaer, NY United States

Anne Messer, PhD, earned her BS in chemistry from Tufts University and a PhD in molecular biology from the Institute of Molecular Biology, University of Oregon. She was a Helen Hay Whitney postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Dr. Richard Sidman, Department of Neuropathology, Harvard Medical School, where she moved into cellular and molecular studies of neurological mutants, using pre-clinical models. She held several neurological disease and genetics positions within the Wadsworth Center laboratories of the New York State Department of Health, with over 100 publications ranging from protein structure to behavioral genetics, covering multiple neurological diseases.

She is currently a principal investigator at the Neural Stem Cell Institute, Regenerative Research Foundation; and professor of biomedical sciences at the University at Albany, with a focus on novel immunotherapeutic approaches to degenerative diseases.

The Messer lab pioneered using recombinant intracellular antibody fragments, engineered and delivered as genes, to counteract pathological effects of aggregated neurodegenerative disease proteins. Her papers have demonstrated phenotypic corrections in Huntington’s disease neuronal cultures, organotypic brain slice cultures, Drosophila, and pre-clinical brains. A similar approach in Parkinson’s has resulted in publications of bifunctional anti-alpha-synuclein intrabodies/ nanobodies.


Associated Grants

  • Intrabodies in Pre-clinical Models of Parkinson’s Disease

    2014


  • Developing and Characterizing Anti-Alpha-Synuclein Nanobodies from an Immune Phage Display Library

    2011


We use cookies to ensure that you get the best experience. By continuing to use this website, you indicate that you have read our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.